REVIEW: Batman & Robin #5

Batman & Robin #5Written by PETER J. TOMASI
Art by PATRICK GLEASON & MICK GRAY

Colors by JOHN KALISZ / Letters by PAT BROSSEAU

Following last month’s issue, it’s not surprising that Peter Tomasi is taking things a bit slower this time around. Tomasi takes this issue to catch everyone up on the history of Bruce’s relationship with Morgan. It slows the issue down but gives everyone a well deserve breather from the emotional heartache suffered last month.

The flashback really doesn’t bother me that much, since we have to remember that this was a New 52 book, and these hypothetical “new readers” will need a bit of a cram session. This is fine, as I’m sure we’ll be thrown into another angst fill issue next month – with an arc title like “Batman Betrayed!” it’s hard to think otherwise.

The book starts with Bruce discovering that Damian has flown the coop, and followed Morgan. Having a revelation of his own, he finally admits to inadvertently pushing his son away, and swears to get him back. Tomasi tries to fit the flashback into the issue, but the reasoning behind it doesn’t make a lot of sense.

Basically, as Batman searches for Damian, he decides that this would be an excellent time to record his thought process during his search, and in effect also give us Morgan’s background.  I know it’s comic book logic, but it just seems very strange when you see panels of him beating up crooks while he’s recording this guy’s biography.

Patrick Gleason is faced again with his greatest foe: daylight scenes and full body figures. Last issue his art worked so well because the scenes took place at night, and the shots were torso/head shots.His anatomy work seems off, with bodies looking lopsided, as well as off-balanced when sitting on chairs or near furniture. Background are also simplified too, with some panels reverted to oversimplified scenery or just altogether blank.

After the flashbacks are over and we’re back to the dark and shadowy world of Gotham, the art gets back on rails. Regardless, with such a big chunk of the issue being the flashback, it’s not something easily overlooked.

While this may be a bit of a filler issue, it’s an important aspect to the story as well as a necessity when dealing with universe of the New 52. It’s still an entertaining read, even if it leaves readers with the same cliffhanger from last month.

 WRITING: 4/5
ART: 3/5
OVERALL: 3.5/5

About Caroline Albanese

Caroline watches a lot of cartoons, reads a lot of comics and plays a lot of video games. Evangelist for each iteration of Robin the Boy Wonder, Caroline's a self-proclaimed Pokémon Master, lover of candy, and most importantly your friend. Follow her on Twitter @Calbanese

3 comments on “REVIEW: Batman & Robin #5

  1. YO IMA LET YOU FINISH BUT SUPERMAN IS THE BEST COMIC EVER. HIS USE OF PRIMARY COLORS IN HIS OUTFIT IS DA SHIZ AND AS SOMEONE WHO IS COLOR BLIND I DON’T APPRECIATE BATMAN ALWAYS CHILLIN IN DA SHADOWS. YOU CAN FINISH NOW.

  2. @Muhteeus, I haven’t read this article but I just wanted to comment on how unnecessary it is to use all capital letters. It feels like an attack on my eyes and I don’t have 20/20 vision to begin with, so that’s pretty messed up.

  3. It really aggravates me that @Rihanna and @Muhteeus are making such clearly uneducated comments on this article. Although I completely disagree with most of the points you make, especially in regards to Tomasi’s choice to portray what Bruce is thinking, it is totally irrelevant to even drag Superman into this. Superman, by they way, is completely void of intellectual value. The whole kryptonite thing is a total scam on when peanut allergies came to light in the U.S., this is all about George Washington Carver.

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