INHUMANS: ATTILAN RISING #3 [Review]

inhumans attilan rising 3 cvr
INHUMANS: ATTILAN RISING #3/ Written by CHARLES SOULE/ Pencils by JOHN TIMMS/ Inks by ROBERT POGGI/ Colors by FRANK D’ARMATA/ Letters by CLAYTON COWLES/ Published by MARVEL COMICS

The set-up from the previous two installments of Inhumans: Attilan Rising pits Black Bolt (or rather, Blackagar Boltagon) and his underground rebellion against Medusa and her agents of Doom. The rebels – a.k.a The Voice Unheard – run a club called The Quiet Room and Medusa’s agents come snooping, looking around for evidence linking the club to the insurgents. This leads to Black Bolt and his team being confronted by Medusa, and that’s where Attilan Rising #3 begins.

Face-to-face, the two opposing sides and their leaders meet and exchange some quick dialogue before the battle breaks out. While Inhumans: Attilan Rising wastes no time getting to the action, the series itself hadn’t really given readers a chance to get to know either side before throwing them at each other. Other than Black Bolt, the rebels are pretty out matched and it’s shown by just how much almost immediately.

Meanwhile, back at the The Quiet Room, Matt Murdoch and company face off against their own handful of Medusa’s agents who are holding Kamala Khan hostage. Daredevil has been shoved into most of the Secret Wars stories in one way or another, which is fine given that he’s one of the best and recently more popular characters. However, his role here and with the underground Inhumans seems ill-fitting.

A failed escape attempt, a beaten and drained group of fighters, and a whole bunch of Inhuman on Inhuman violence leads to the great and powerful Blackagar giving himself up in exchange for freeing his companions. Black Bolt is one of the coolest and most mysterious characters Marvel has ever created. He’s been around a long time and has easily become a fan favorite. However, this alternate take from Attilan Rising was only interesting at first when there was still mystery to him, now there’s little left that connects him to the original Black Bolt. Hopefully, the conclusion of this series is an indication of what we will see of him throughout the rest of the arc.

inhumans attilan rising 3 interior

Most of the character designs in Inhumans: Attilan Rising are pretty neat (other than the hooded “incognito” look Black Bolt is sporting). John Timm’s artwork has its good moments and its bad – some panels come across unfinished while others pop off the page during the action sequences. And readers may find themselves revisiting previous panels that were initially too confusing in order to piece together exactly what is happening. Overall, the visuals presented are fine, although they do leave something to be desired once that final page is reached.

The same could be said about the book in its entirety – Inhumans: Attilan Rising is not bad by any means, it’s just not great. This issue pushes the story along effectively enough and places both opposing forces right in each other’s faces (with one side clearly having the upper hand). In the end, Inhumans: Attilan Rising #3 will be easily summarized in the introduction to the next installment, and though it’s not exactly a waste of time, it definitely isn’t the most exciting time we’ve shared with the Inhumans.

Rating 3

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